The Butterfly Effect and Back Pain - Why a MRI in most cases is a Waste of Money

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The Butterfly Effect and Back Pain - Why a MRI in most cases is a Waste of Money

In chaos theory, the Butterfly Effect refers to the concept that small causes can have large profound effects.

The same can be said about the management and treatment of low back pain.

At any point in your journey of experiencing back pain- from onset of pain to rehab and recovery, it has been well researched that how or what you are diagnosed with coupled with what your therapist even says can change how you recover.

Here are some facts:

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Loading..... Please wait and your Success will be Right with You

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Loading..... Please wait and your Success will be Right with You

Load management is a hot topic right now in the sporting world. What’s too much? What’s too little? From a physiotherapy perspective, one of the trickier things when working with athletes is to decide when is the right time to return to competition after injury and have they earned the right to return to their desired activity?

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Fascia, Tensegrity & The Continuous Ambush of Tension

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Fascia, Tensegrity & The Continuous Ambush of Tension

Now I’m not casting aspersions on any childhood songs in particular, but we have a tendency to imagine the body in movement as a rigid frame being pulled on by distinct muscles to produce specific joint actions. eg: the hamstrings pull on the shin bones to produce knee flexion. While this is not technically incorrect, are we sure this is the best way to view and address human movement?

If we were talking about robots, then I think it would be a fine. In that case, treating any pain or dysfunction would be more a case of finding the part that wasn’t working and fixing the hydraulics at that joint.

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Law, Order & Pressing a Case for Kettlebell Strength

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Law, Order & Pressing a Case for Kettlebell Strength

Most people know what the rotator cuff is, and most know that with the majority of shoulder injuries there should be an element for rotator cuff strengthening in their rehab program.  The majority of clients are pretty savvy too, and they know they should add some release work around their shoulder and work on some thoracic mobility, which is great! Some clients come to us and they reel off all the exercises they are doing for their rehab and what they are doing actually sounds pretty good. So the question is, why aren’t they getting better? Most of the time it's because the quality or intensity of their rehab isn’t up to scratch. This brings me back to my last blog on about quality being the key factor that can make or break your rehab. (Link to Last Blog)

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