1. Pectoralis Major and Minor

The Pectoralis Major acts as a stabiliser of the humerus, helping to flex, adduct and medially rotate the humerus. Whilst Pectoralis Minor draws the scapula forward and downward.

Originating from the Sternum, Clavicle and Ribs the Pectorals insert into the coracoid process of the scapula (pec minor) and bicipital groove of the head of humerus (pec major)

Utilising the Sceptre into the corner of a wall use with a trigger action (Pushing into the muscle) holding and then letting go. Utilising small circular mobilisations on the muscle belly and running the sceptre across the muscle fibres horizontally will aim to release the pectorals and allow them to release the head of the humerus and scapula, letting the humerus sit back smoothly in its socket

Sceptre release for the Pectorals

Sceptre release for the Pectorals

2. Ist Rib and Scalene Muscles

The Scalene Muscles are the work horses of our Neck. Helping to elevate the first and second rib, aid inspiration and laterally flexing the neck to the same side, the scalenes are small pocket rockets.

Originating from the transverse processes of the Cervical Spine

C2 – C7, the scalenes insert into the superior aspect of the first and second rib

We can leverage off a wall and utilise the power of the sceptre to help mobilise our first rib and release the scalenes. Hold/relax techniques will work well, in addition to small mobilisations by putting pressure onto the first rib and releasing quickly. Here in truth lies the beauty of the Sceptre.

Sceptre release for the 1st Rib and Scalenes

Sceptre release for the 1st Rib and Scalenes

3. Subscapularis

Subscapularis or the forgotten warrior of Rotator cuffing helps to rotate the head of the humerus medially and is a powerful defender of the displacement of the humerus anteriorly.

Originating for the Subscapular Fossa of the Scapula and inserting onto the Lesser Tubercle of the humerus and the anterior part of the shoulder capsule, Subscapularis is often neglected of mobilisation and release.

Utilising the Sceptre into the armpit we can place pressure directly onto ‘Subscap’ and utilise small circular mobilisations and hold relax techniques to release the muscle fibres. 

Sceptre release for Subscapularis

Sceptre release for Subscapularis

4. Tensor Fascia Lata

Tensor Fascia Lata is the younger brother of a popular and well known older brother the iliotibial band.

Aiding in abduction and flexion of the thigh at the hip, the TFL is a chronic overworker. Tensor Fascia Lata Originates at the iliac crest of the pelvis and inserts into the iliotibial tract.

Use the Sceptre to direct pressure onto the TFL with hold/relax techniques and mobilisations horizontally and circular across the muscle fibres.

Sceptre release for Tensor Fascia Lata

Sceptre release for Tensor Fascia Lata

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alex-drew-physiotherapist

Alex Drew is the director of Evolutio. A business in Australia which aims to bridge the gap between CrossFitters and Health Professionals. He is a Physiotherapist, CrossFit Level 1 and Powerlifting Trainer

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